Monday, 10 February 2014

Get a life, scammer! (Spotting scams)

Hey lovelies
I was recently invited to a conference on child abuse, human trafficking and unemployment by SCAMMERS.




Turns out I was writing a poetic piece on child abuse at the time and they offered me an opportunity to present during the conference.
The first thing that came to my mind was, wow! How timely! I only glanced through the message and hurried off to somewhere important I needed to be.  
All through my drive there, I was thinking, wow! I'm just going to finish off the work I have right now and present that.

The lions club was also having a conference a day after this conference and my peeps were going to be there in the states for the conference. 
I didn't want to go for the lions club one, mainly because it was going to involve a lot of money, a lot of running around, a lot of sacrifices basically, just to be one of the delegates at a conference. Did I mention that I hate the process of traveling? I'm sure I have mentioned that before. It's going through the process of planning trips that stresses me out the most. 
For this one on child abuse, they were going to do everything. All expense paid; visa, flight tickets, hotel sourcing and booking, they'd cater for me, so I didn't need to go there and start finding anyone or anything basically, plus it was a topic that piqued my interest, plus, they said I was recommended by one of their staffs. For reals? Just the kind of excitement I needed. I couldn't wait to debut my just written piece on child abuse to a very relevant audience. 
I was so looking forward to it. But I like to procrastinate with things like these a lot, or I like to take my time and digest all the details, better put, so I saved the email until when I had some good time to read it carefully. 

I told my mum, "I think I just might attend that lions club meeting. Seems like I'll be in the states at about that time, but I'm not sure yet."
I thought, if I'm going to be in the states around then, then I just might chill and attend that one as well before traveling back. Talk about some high hopes!

And then I found some time to read the email.
And I decided to give her/him a reply because obviously he/she reads this blog and knew exactly how to grab my attention. 

Dear Lilian Douglas/Doglas
I am very happy to inform you that I will not be sending my passport details to you, as I do not plan to attend your very interesting 'conference'.  
It was quite an interesting one, but it's so hard not to detect a clear scam like that. Get a real job and live a decent life. Every one can.

Cheers 

I'm not going to tell you how I was able to detect that it was a huge scam because I do not want to enlighten that scammer on his/her obvious weak points. I am hoping that they'll continue to make such huge mistakes so everyone can be as smart as I was to easily detect them.
I will not tell the ones that confirmed my doubt 'cause those are my defenses and I wouldn't want to rid myself of them, lest they wise up and play it better. I'm just going to give anyone reading this some pointers to look out for, so you do not fall for these people. The rate at which they are every where these days is actually alarming. Please, peeps, be careful!

1. They contacted me first through Facebook. That is the biggest hub for scammers. I scrutinize everything that comes via Facebook. 
I saw the email they sent to my personal account first, just because I do not go to FB frequently these days (actually for a while now). When I eventually logged on Facebook and saw that was where they tried to reach me first, I was like whoa! 

2. Ok guys! I checked out their Facebook page. That was all the confirmation I needed. It just screamed Fake! Fake! That account was so fake it was, annoyingly so. I tried to link it here but  I noticed the links to all the fake people that usually send "Hi, My name is... My email is..." have become inactive, including this one. I guess FB's admin have decided to do something about them.
If you cannot tell that a FB account is fake, I will advise that you talk to no strangers on FB, because you'd be taking a big risk. With my blog and all, I can't completely ignore talking to people through platforms like those, so I just have to sort them out. 

3. The funniest one was, from her private email she was Lilian Douglas and on Facebook, she forgot to spell it right, so she became Lilian Doglas. Was she in a hurry when she was trying to create the account? Just too funny!

4. And basically, if it sounds too good to be true. Be skeptic!
Ask yourself questions like, Wouldn't you need some time to put something like that together if you were in their shoes? I would actually need months to plan something like that; put together a guest list and reach them months before the date. No, they were going to plan it well and have me over in the states in just two weeks. Of course, these scammers are obviously working with time. The sooner they get things done, the better. What am I? Some kind of a celebrity that you just discovered that I need to be there and you want to do everything it takes to bring me? Pls! Be realistic next time. 

Like I mentioned earlier, won't be giving my big clues, but then those should tick off something in you.
And when it does, confirm your doubts by checking them up.
Check out sites like - www.scamdex.com, www.scamomatic.com
Pls be careful!

P.s: I know I promised to put up a post on the '14 for 14' challenge, I'm just taking my time. Really don't know why I'm so lazy with it. I'll try soonest :)

Love always
JB


10 comments:

  1. Ms JB, truly it sounds too good to be true. Thank God you caught them before they caught you oh.. E for no funny.:-) Just keep shining the light for us young minds. I know some bad belle haters will always want to dim it, but grace will keep it burning.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for the revelation. Apart from your passport details, do they ask for money or any other info?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, they didn't
      I'm sure at some point they would have
      They just need to ascertain how desperate you are, then they can ride well :)

      Delete
  3. They approached me on facebook too. I asked the scammer what i did to qualify for the interesting conference

    ReplyDelete
  4. The spelling mistake could be due to a defective "u" on the keyboard. Don't they even proof-read? lol I doubt they are even listed at the Better Business Bureau. They are listed as one of the scammers here: http://www.uia.be/fr/fraud_monitor?page=1

    ReplyDelete

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